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dc.contributor.authorArgüeso, David
dc.contributor.authorPicon, Artzai
dc.contributor.authorIrusta, Unai
dc.contributor.authorMedela, Alfonso
dc.contributor.authorSan-Emeterio, Miguel G
dc.contributor.authorBereciartua, Arantza
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez-Gila, Aitor
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-09T17:25:05Z
dc.date.available2020-07-09T17:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.citationArgüeso, David, Artzai Picon, Unai Irusta, Alfonso Medela, Miguel G San-Emeterio, Arantza Bereciartua, and Aitor Alvarez-Gila. “Few-Shot Learning Approach for Plant Disease Classification Using Images Taken in the Field.” Computers and Electronics in Agriculture 175 (August 2020): 105542. doi:10.1016/j.compag.2020.105542en
dc.identifier.issn0168-1699en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/940
dc.description.abstractPrompt plant disease detection is critical to prevent plagues and to mitigate their effects on crops. The most accurate automatic algorithms for plant disease identification using plant field images are based on deep learning. These methods require the acquisition and annotation of large image datasets, which is frequently technically or economically unfeasible. This study introduces Few-Shot Learning (FSL) algorithms for plant leaf classification using deep learning with small datasets. For the study 54,303 labeled images from the PlantVillage dataset were used, comprising 38 plant leaf and/or disease types (classes). The data was split into a source (32 classes) and a target (6 classes) domain. The Inception V3 network was fine-tuned in the source domain to learn general plant leaf characteristics. This knowledge was transferred to the target domain to learn new leaf types from few images. FSL using Siamese networks and Triplet loss was used and compared to classical fine-tuning transfer learning. The source and target domain sets were split into a training set (80%) to develop the methods and a test set (20%) to obtain the results. Algorithm performance was evaluated using the total accuracy, and the precision and recall per class. For the FSL experiments the algorithms were trained with different numbers of images per class and the experiments were repeated 20 times to statistically characterize the results. The accuracy in the source domain was 91.4% (32 classes), with a median precision/recall per class of 93.8%/92.6%. The accuracy in the target domain was 94.0% (6 classes) learning from all the training data, and the median accuracy (90% confidence interval) learning from 1 image per class was 55.5 (46.0–61.7)%. Median accuracies of 80.0 (76.4–86.5)% and 90.0 (86.1–94.2)% were reached for 15 and 80 images per class, yielding a reduction of 89.1% (80 images/class) in the training dataset with only a 4-point loss in accuracy. The FSL method outperformed the classical fine tuning transfer learning which had accuracies of 18.0 (16.0–24.0)% and 72.0 (68.0–77.3)% for 1 and 80 images per class, respectively. It is possible to learn new plant leaf and disease types with very small datasets using deep learning Siamese networks with Triplet loss, achieving almost a 90% reduction in training data needs and outperforming classical learning techniques for small training sets.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the ELKARTEK Research Programme of the Basque Government. Project #KK-2019/00068 and through grant IT-1229-19en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en
dc.titleFew-Shot Learning approach for plant disease classification using images taken in the fielden
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.compag.2020.105542en
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsFew-Shot Learning (FSL)en
dc.subject.keywordsPlant diseaseen
dc.subject.keywordsFungal plant diseaseen
dc.subject.keywordsBacterial plant diseaseen
dc.subject.keywordsDeep learningen
dc.subject.keywordsConvolutional Neural Network (CNN)en
dc.subject.keywordsTriplet lossen
dc.subject.keywordsContrastive lossen
dc.journal.titleComputers and Electronics in Agricultureen
dc.page.initial105542en
dc.volume.number175en


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