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dc.contributor.authorLópez-Larraz, E.
dc.contributor.authorSarasola-Sanz, A.
dc.contributor.authorIrastorza-Landa, N.
dc.contributor.authorBirbaumer, N.
dc.contributor.authorRamos-Murguialday, A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-28T12:07:20Z
dc.date.available2018-08-28T12:07:20Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationLópez-Larraz, E., A. Sarasola-Sanz, N. Irastorza-Landa, N. Birbaumer, and A. Ramos-Murguialday. “Brain-Machine Interfaces for Rehabilitation in Stroke: A Review.” Edited by Richard L. Harvey. NeuroRehabilitation 43, no. 1 (July 24, 2018): 77–97. doi:10.3233/nre-172394.en
dc.identifier.issn1053-8135en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/603
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Motor paralysis after stroke has devastating consequences for the patients, families and caregivers. Although therapies have improved in the recent years, traditional rehabilitation still fails in patients with severe paralysis. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have emerged as a promising tool to guide motor rehabilitation interventions as they can be applied to patients with no residual movement. OBJECTIVE: This paper reviews the efficiency of BMI technologies to facilitate neuroplasticity and motor recovery after stroke. METHODS: We provide an overview of the existing rehabilitation therapies for stroke, the rationale behind the use of BMIs for motor rehabilitation, the current state of the art and the results achieved so far with BMI-based interventions, as well as the future perspectives of neural-machine interfaces. RESULTS: Since the first pilot study by Buch and colleagues in 2008, several controlled clinical studies have been conducted, demonstrating the efficacy of BMIs to facilitate functional recovery in completely paralyzed stroke patients with noninvasive technologies such as the electroencephalogram (EEG). CONCLUSIONS: Despite encouraging results, motor rehabilitation based on BMIs is still in a preliminary stage, and further improvements are required to boost its efficacy. Invasive and hybrid approaches are promising and might set the stage for the next generation of stroke rehabilitation therapies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung BMBF MOTORBIC (FKZ13GW0053)andAMORSA(FKZ16SV7754), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the fortüne-Program of the University of Tübingen (2422-0-0 and 2452-0-0), and the Basque GovernmentScienceProgram(EXOTEK:KK2016/00083). NIL was supported by the Basque Government’s scholarship for predoctoral students.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherIOS Pressen
dc.titleBrain-machine interfaces for rehabilitation in stroke: A reviewen
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/NRE-172394en
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsBrain-machine interfaces (BMI)en
dc.subject.keywordsStrokeen
dc.subject.keywordsRehabilitationen
dc.subject.keywordsNeuroplasticityen
dc.subject.keywordsMotor recoveryen
dc.identifier.essn1878-6448en
dc.issue.number1en
dc.journal.titleNeuroRehabilitationen
dc.page.final97en
dc.page.initial77en
dc.volume.number43en


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