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dc.contributor.authorMehler, David Marc Anton
dc.contributor.authorReichenbach, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Julius
dc.contributor.authorDiedrichsen, Jörn
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T11:11:22Z
dc.date.available2017-12-12T11:11:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-18
dc.identifier.citationMehler DMA, Reichenbach A, Klein J, Diedrichsen J (2017) Minimizing endpoint variability through reinforcement learning during reaching movements involving shoulder, elbow and wrist. PLoS ONE 12(7): e0180803. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180803en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/471
dc.description.abstractReaching movements are comprised of the coordinated action across multiple joints. The human skeleton is redundant for this task because different joint configurations can lead to the same endpoint in space. How do people learn to use combinations of joints that maximize success in goal-directed motor tasks? To answer this question, we used a 3-degreeof-freedom manipulandum to measure shoulder, elbow and wrist joint movements during reaching in a plane. We tested whether a shift in the relative contribution of the wrist and elbow joints to a reaching movement could be learned by an implicit reinforcement regime. Unknown to the participants, we decreased the task success for certain joint configurations (wrist flexion or extension, respectively) by adding random variability to the endpoint feedback. In return, the opposite wrist postures were rewarded in the two experimental groups (flexion and extension group). We found that the joint configuration slowly shifted towards movements that provided more control over the endpoint and hence higher task success. While the overall learning was significant, only the group that was guided to extend the wrist joint more during the movement showed substantial learning. Importantly, all changes in movement pattern occurred independent of conscious awareness of the experimental manipulation. These findings suggest that the motor system is generally sensitive to its output variability and can optimize joint-space solutions that minimize task-relevant output variability. We discuss biomechanical biases (e.g. joint's range of movement) that could impose hurdles to the learning process.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC; BB/ J009458/1; http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/), a studentship from Heinrich Boell Foundation to D.M.A.M. (https://www.boell.de/en), and a postdoctoral fellowship of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG; RE 3265/1-1; http://www.dfg.de/). Tecnalia Research and Innovation provided support in the form of salaries for J.K., but did not have any additional role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The specific roles of all authors are articulated in the 'author contributions' section. We thank Etienne Burdet and Nick Roach for their contribution to the development of the robotic interface and the Heinrich Boll Foundation for supporting David Mehler with a studentship. We also thank Harry Manley and Oscar Woolnough for helpful comments on an earlier manuscript of this paper.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 1160 BATTERY STREET, STE 100, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111 USAen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleMinimizing endpoint variability through reinforcement learning during reaching movements involving shoulder, elbow and wristen
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0180803en
dc.isiYesen
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsMotor Controlen
dc.subject.keywordsStrokeen
dc.subject.keywordsCoordinationen
dc.subject.keywordsCerebellumen
dc.subject.keywordsTasken
dc.subject.keywordsAdaptationen
dc.subject.keywordsDynamicsen
dc.subject.keywordsRecoveryen
dc.subject.keywordsBehavioren
dc.subject.keywordsTherapyen
dc.issue.number7en
dc.journal.titlePLOS ONEen
dc.volume.number12en


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    Attribution 4.0 InternationalExcept where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International