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dc.contributor.authorOlabarrieta, Josune
dc.contributor.authorMonzón, Oihane
dc.contributor.authorBelaustegui, Yolanda
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Jon-Iñaki
dc.contributor.authorZorita, Saioa
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-17T12:00:14Z
dc.date.available2017-11-17T12:00:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-15
dc.identifier.citationOlabarrieta, Josune, Oihane Monzón, Yolanda Belaustegui, Jon-Iñaki Alvarez, and Saioa Zorita. “Removal of TiO 2 Nanoparticles from Water by Low Pressure Pilot Plant Filtration.” Science of The Total Environment 618 (March 2018): 551–560. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.003.en
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/462
dc.description.abstractRising use of nanoparticles in manufacturing as well as in commercial products bring issues related to environmental release and human exposure. A large amount of TiO2 nanoparticles will eventually reach wastewater treatment plants. Low pressure membrane filtration has been suggested as a feasible treatment of water streams. This study investigated first at laboratory scale the influence of: i) membrane material, ii) pore size and iii) water chemistry on nTiO2 removal. TiO2 retention was governed by the cake layer formation mechanism and significant retention of nanoparticles was observed even for filters having considerably larger pores than nTiO2. PVDF showed a great potential for nTiO2 rejection. Additionally, filtration pilot plant experiments were carried out using PVDF membranes (0.03 and 0.4 μm pore size). The release of nTiO2 in the pilot scale filtration system was always above the instrumental detection limit (> 1.5 μg/L) and in most cases below 100 μg/L regardless of the pore size and applied conditions. The nTiO2 membrane breakthrough predominantly occurred in the first few minutes after backwashes and ceased when the cake layer was formed. Ultrafiltration and microfiltration were comparable with rejection of nTiO2 above 95% at similar permeate flow rates. Nevertheless, ultrafiltration is more promising than microfiltration because it allowed longer operation times between backwash cycles.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Provincial Government of Bizkaia (6-12-TK-2010-0013).en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDSen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleRemoval of TiO 2 nanoparticles from water by low pressure pilot plant filtrationen
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.003en
dc.isiYesen
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsMicrofiltrationen
dc.subject.keywordsUltrafiltrationen
dc.subject.keywordsNanoparticleen
dc.subject.keywordsSeparationen
dc.subject.keywordsCake formationen
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental releaseen
dc.identifier.essn1879-1026en
dc.journal.titleScience of The Total Environmenten
dc.page.final560en
dc.page.initial551en
dc.volume.number618en


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