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dc.contributor.authorIzard, Jean-Baptiste
dc.contributor.authorDubor, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorHervé, Pierre-Elie
dc.contributor.authorCabay, Edouard
dc.contributor.authorCulla, David
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Mariola
dc.contributor.authorBarrado, Mikel
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-07T08:01:16Z
dc.date.available2017-09-07T08:01:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-30
dc.identifier.citationIzard, Jean-Baptiste, Alexandre Dubor, Pierre-Elie Hervé, Edouard Cabay, David Culla, Mariola Rodriguez, and Mikel Barrado. “Large-Scale 3D Printing with Cable-Driven Parallel Robots.” Construction Robotics (August 30, 2017). doi:10.1007/s41693-017-0008-0.en
dc.identifier.issn2509-811Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/414
dc.description.abstractGantry robots and anthropomorphic arms of various sizes have already been studied and, while they are in use in some parts of the world for automated construction, a new kind of wide workspace machinery, cable-driven parallel robots (CDPR), has emerged. These robots are capable of automated movement in a very wide workspace, using cables reeled in and out by winches as actuation members, the other elements being easily stacked for easy relocation and reconfiguration, which is critical for on-site construction. The motivation of this paper is to showcase the potential of a CDPR operating solely on motor position sensors and showing limited collisions from the cables for large-scale applications in the building industry relevant for additive manufacturing, without risk of collisions between the cables and the building. The combination of the Cogiro CDPR (Tecnalia, LIRMM-CNRS 2010) with the extruder and material of the Pylos project (IAAC 2013) opens the opportunity to a 3D printing machine with a workspace of 13.6 × 9.4 × 3.3 m. The design patterns for printing on such a large scale are disclosed, as well as the modifications that were necessary for both the Cogiro robot and Pylos extruder and material. Two prints, with different patterns, have been achieved with the Pylos extruder mounted on Cogiro: the first spanning 3.5 m in length, the second, reaching a height of 0.86 m. Based on this initial experiment, plans for building larger parts and buildings are discussed, as well as other possible applications for CDPRs in construction, such as the manipulation of assembly processes (windows, lintels, beams, floor elements, curtain wall modules, etc.) or brick laying.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.titleLarge-scale 3D printing with cable-driven parallel robotsen
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s41693-017-0008-0en
dc.isiNoen
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsAdditive manufacturingen
dc.subject.keywordsCable-driven parallel robotsen
dc.subject.keywordsInnovative constructionen
dc.subject.keywordsOn-site digital fabricationen
dc.subject.keywordsParametric designen
dc.subject.keywordsPeriodic continuous lineen
dc.identifier.essn2509-8780en
dc.journal.titleConstruction Roboticsen
dc.page.final8en
dc.page.initial1en


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