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dc.contributor.authorNieto-Maestre, Javier
dc.contributor.authorIparraguirre-Torres, Iñigo
dc.contributor.authorAmondarain-Velasco, Z.
dc.contributor.authorKaltzakorta, Idurre
dc.contributor.authorMerchán-Zubieta, Mikel
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-08T09:02:43Z
dc.date.available2016-09-08T09:02:43Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-31
dc.identifier.citationAIP Conf. Proc. 1734, 050032 (2016)en
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-7354-1386-3en
dc.identifier.issn0094-243Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/282
dc.description.abstractConcentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms of these proposed eutectic alloys are too high for currently available DSG solar fields, for instance the Mg49-Zn51 alloy melts at 342°C requiring saturated steam pressures above 160 bar to charge the TES unit. Being aware of this, novel eutectic metallic alloys have been designed reducing the Tms to the range between 285°C and 330°C (79bar and 145bar of charging steam pressure respectively) with ΔHfs between 150 and 170 J/g, and thus achieving metallic Phase Change Materials (PCM) suitable for the available DSG technologies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Comission's FP7en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherAMER INST PHYSICS, 2 HUNTINGTON QUADRANGLE, STE 1NO1, MELVILLE, NY 11747-4501 USAen
dc.titleNovel Metallic Alloys as Phase Change Materials for Heat Storage in Direct Steam Generation Applicationsen
dc.typeconferenceObjecten
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.4949130en
dc.isiYesen
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/609837/EU/Scientific and Technological Alliance for Guaranteeing the European Excellence in Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy/STAGE-STEen
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keywordseutectic alloysen


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