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dc.contributor.authorMarcano, Mauricio
dc.contributor.authorTango, Fabio
dc.contributor.authorSarabia, Joseba
dc.contributor.authorCastellano, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorPérez, Joshué
dc.contributor.authorIrigoyen, Eloy
dc.contributor.authorDíaz, Sergio
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-13T12:26:05Z
dc.date.available2021-09-13T12:26:05Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-28
dc.identifier.citationMarcano, Mauricio, Fabio Tango, Joseba Sarabia, Andrea Castellano, Joshué Pérez, Eloy Irigoyen, and Sergio Díaz. “From the Concept of Being ‘the Boss’ to the Idea of Being ‘a Team’: The Adaptive Co-Pilot as the Enabler for a New Cooperative Framework.” Applied Sciences 11, no. 15 (July 28, 2021): 6950. doi:10.3390/app11156950.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11556/1191
dc.description.abstractThe “classical” SAE LoA for automated driving can present several drawbacks, and the SAE-L2 and SAE-L3, in particular, can lead to the so-called “irony of automation”, where the driver is substituted by the artificial system, but is still regarded as a “supervisor” or as a “fallback mechanism”. To overcome this problem, while taking advantage of the latest technology, we regard both human and machine as members of a unique team that share the driving task. Depending on the available resources (in terms of driver’s status, system state, and environment conditions) and considering that they are very dynamic, an adaptive assignment of authority for each member of the team is needed. This is achieved by designing a technology enabler, constituted by the intelligent and adaptive co-pilot. It comprises (1) a lateral shared controller based on NMPC, which applies the authority, (2) an arbitration module based on FIS, which calculates the authority, and (3) a visual HMI, as an enabler of trust in automation decisions and actions. The benefits of such a system are shown in this paper through a comparison of the shared control driving mode, with manual driving (as a baseline) and lane-keeping and lane-centering (as two commercial ADAS). Tests are performed in a use case where support for a distracted driver is given. Quantitative and qualitative results confirm the hypothesis that shared control offers the best balance between performance, safety, and comfort during the driving task.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the ECSEL Joint-Undertaking,which funded the PRYSTINE project under the Grant 783190.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)en
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleFrom the Concept of Being “the Boss” to the Idea of Being “a Team”: The Adaptive Co-Pilot as the Enabler for a New Cooperative Frameworken
dc.typearticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/app11156950en
dc.relation.projectIDnfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/783190/EU/Programmable Systems for Intelligence in Automobiles/PRYSTINEen
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keywordsHuman–computer interactionen
dc.subject.keywordsAutomated drivingen
dc.subject.keywordsShared controlen
dc.subject.keywordsArbitrationen
dc.subject.keywordsModelen
dc.subject.keywordsPredictive controlen
dc.subject.keywordsAdvance driver assistance systemsen
dc.subject.keywordsHuman-centered vehicleen
dc.subject.keywordsDriver–automation cooperationen
dc.identifier.essn2076-3417en
dc.issue.number15en
dc.journal.titleApplied Sciencesen
dc.page.initial6950en
dc.volume.number11en


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